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phineas gage

Gage.Skull_frontview.jpg

phineas gage 

In 1848, Gage, 25, was the foreman of a crew cutting a railroad bed in Cavendish, Vermont. On September 13, as he was using a tamping iron to pack explosive powder into a hole, the powder detonated. The tamping iron—43 inches long, 1.25 inches in diameter and weighing 13.25 pounds—shot skyward, penetrated Gage’s left cheek, ripped into his brain and exited through his skull, landing several dozen feet away. Though blinded in his left eye, he might not even have lost consciousness, and he remained savvy enough to tell a doctor that day, “Here is business enough for you.”

- by Steve Twomey

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/phineas-gage-neurosciences-most-famous-patient-11390067/#FX5OofdJW2jOilvI.99